A roof’s lifespan is a huge factor when deciding which roofing material is right for your replacement. Every homeowner is expecting their new roof to last as long as possible. 

But each type of roof comes with a different lifespan. This is especially true if you’re interested in slate tiles for your upcoming roof replacement. 

A slate roof is one of the most beautiful and expensive roof types on the market. It’s also one of the most durable and longest-lasting. 

But how long will your slate roof actually last? Because we want every homeowner to have all the information they need to make the right buying decision, we’re going to break it down for you. 

The team at Bill Ragan Roofing has been repairing, installing, and maintaining all roof types (including slate) in the Nashville area since 1990. We take pride in educating you and other homeowners so they can make the right purchasing decisions. With our unique advisory and educational approach, you won’t find another experience like it in the roofing industry. 

By the end of this article, you’ll learn how long a slate roof lasts and the 3 things that impact the lifespan. 

How long does a slate roof last?

Your new slate roof is a premium roof system made primarily out of natural slate tiles and other slate roofing materials. It’s one of the most beautiful and long-lasting roof systems on the market.

But how long will your new slate roof last?

how long does a slate roof last

As long as your slate roof is properly installed and flashed properly, it’ll be the last roof you ever put on your home. We even like to say your grandkids won’t have to worry about it. 

It’s hard to put an exact number on the lifespan, but there’s no reason a slate roof shouldn’t live around 75 years or even close to 100. Be aware, slate roof tiles are made naturally, so there’s no manufacturer warranty on the materials. 

This leaves you with only your roofing contractor’s workmanship warranty to rely on if there’s ever a problem with your slate roof.

3 things that impact the life of your slate roof

Now that you know how long your new slate roof will last, you need to know what affects its lifespan. While it’s considered a lifetime roofing material, there are a few things that determine if your slate roof will reach its potential. 

1. Hiring a roofing contractor that has experience installing slate roofs

Hiring a reputable roofing contractor is crucial to your slate roof investment. Remember, as long as your slate roof is installed and flashed properly, you shouldn’t have to worry about it again. 

That makes hiring a local roofing contractor that has experience installing slate roofs crucial to your investment. The reason for this because it takes a really skilled roofer or someone that’s been trained properly to handle and install the slate tiles. 

Each individual tile has to be carefully handled because they’re easily breakable. If the installers don’t know how to do this, the slate tiles will break, you’ll have problems, and your roof’s life will be cut short. 

No matter if you need repairs or a full roof replacement, your contractor plays a huge role in the life you get out of your slate roof. But a history of proper roof installation isn’t the only thing you need to look for when hiring a local roofing contractor.

To ensure you hire a great local contractor, check out this article on what you need to look for in a roofing contractor

2. The amount of extreme weather your slate roof is exposed to

Every roof goes through wear and tear from the weather throughout its life. If you have a slate roof, you have one of the most durable roofs on the market. 

This means normal weather conditions won’t have as much impact on the life of your slate as it does on the other roof types. But if you live in an area that gets extreme weather (tornados, large hail, trees falling, etc.) frequently, it’s definitely going to impact your slate roof’s life.

Luckily, if your slate roof is hit by extreme weather, you’ll have homeowners insurance to fall back on. There’s nothing you can do about the weather. But be aware extreme weather does factor into the life of your slate roof. 

3. Foot traffic on your slate roof

Remember, slate roof tiles are easily breakable and have to be handled correctly. This is true when they’re installing your slate roof and even after it’s installed. 

After your slate roof is installed, no one should be walking on it unless they know how to maneuver around without breaking one of the tiles. If someone walks on your slate tiles and breaks them, it’s going to lead to a leak and it won’t be easy (or cheap) to replace them. 

This could be a painter, a satellite dish guy, chimney sweeps, or whoever. The important thing is not to let them walk on your roof unless they know what they’re doing. 

The last thing you want to happen after investing in a new slate roof investment is damage and a roof leak caused by foot traffic. 

How much will your new slate roof cost?

Now you know what impacts the life of your slate roof. Remember, a slate roof is considered a lifetime roof. 

As long as you hire a great roofing contractor with experience installing slate roofs, your investment will be well worth it. But how much money will you actually have to invest into a new slate roof?

Unfortunately, the roofing industry doesn’t like to be open about pricing. But we’re not like other roofing companies. 

That’s why we wrote another article, so you know what to expect from a price point for your new slate roof. The next article gives you the cost of a slate roof per square foot and the factors that impact the price. 

The team at Bill Ragan Roofing has proudly helped the residents of Nashville get the roof of their dreams since 1990. While we give you a great-looking roof, we also back up our high-quality workmanship with a lifetime warranty. If you’re local to Nashville or a surrounding area, don’t hesitate to contact us for all your roofing needs. 

To learn how much you’ll have to invest in your new slate roof, check out this article on How Much Does a Slate Roof Cost? (& The Factors That Impact the Price).

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